New job alert!

I am so excited to officially be able to put in writing that I have an amazing new job opportunity that I will be delving into as of August 1!

Ever since getting my MBA, I have been so fortunate when it comes to the kinds of companies I’ve gotten to work with and for on a daily basis. I went back to school full-time when I was 25, and seriously have no doubt that I never would have gotten these opportunities as quickly and see my compensation increase so steadily and dramatically if I hadn’t gone back (longer post later on To MBA or not to MBA).

I’m honestly going from one crazy-major company to another, and I could not feel more blessed/thrilled/hype/in-need-of-a-nap. Working for a big name is always exciting, but being able to work with such major brands as a marketer, on campaigns that get seen by everyone and (quite literally) their mom, for two companies in a row now is just hard for me to believe, sometimes.

So, because I’m slightly giddy (and not taking the aforementioned, much-needed nap), I thought I’d share a little about how it happened.

  • LinkedIn. As demonstrated by the LinkedIn tips I shared in this post, I think LinkedIn is by far the most valuable and important social network for millennials to be tapping into. This moment is a prime example why. I didn’t apply for this amazing new opportunity. This company came to me. On LinkedIn. While I was just living my life one day. (I’M TELLING YOU, LINKEDIN IS MAGIC, PEOPLE.)
  • Patience. Because LinkedIn is magic (as long as you’ve taken the time to set up a great profile), really cool companies might be popping into your inbox all the time. But the role itself might not feel all the way right. Or the location. Or the timing. So, in those cases, I would always engage, make a connection, and stay in touch in case something was a better fit in the future. But I didn’t just give my number out anytime someone tried to buy me a drink at the bar. (To clarify, the “buy me a drink” in this analogy is “send me a message.” “The bar” is “LinkedIn.” And “my number” is…well, my number, I guess.)
  • Interview prep. Business school tries to pretty much train you how to interview. Which, for me, was stressful. I also did a lot of diversity recruiting and candidate screening as a kind of stretch role at my (as of Friday) previous company. So, I think the compilation of those experiences sort of played a passive role in how I prepared for these interviews. This is just me, but – as a marketer – here are a couple of the boxes I make sure to check:
    • A review of the company’s brands. I always make sure I can confidently name at least a few brands (ideally, not just the name on the door or the most obvious ones) and reference some of their latest campaigns on TV and digital. I flag what I like and what I think can be improved, in case I’m asked for my opinion. Which happens in these kinds of conversations. A lot.
    • A review of other company’s brands. I try to do a general competitive analysis a la Google search  so I know what else is going on in that particular industry. And what’s going on with some major brands who might not have anything to do with that industry. A question I would ask when I was conducting phone screens and that I would hear a lot of other companies ask, too, would be “Tell me about a brand whose marketing you really like right now and tell me why.” Or, the opposite of that question (who sucks and why do you think so?).
    • Job description + personal experience alignment exercise. The way I described that sounds hard and not fun but it’s not that bad and actually really easy. Basically, I pull up the job description and then, in a Word doc, I type up next to each bullet a quick example of a time when I did exactly what they’re asking for. First off, it helps me get my thoughts in order and, secondly, it gives me an extra confidence boost to see how qualified I am to be having this conversation with them!
    • Resume review. Just in case they ask me about that thing I did back in 2013 that I totally forgot ever happened.
  • And, lastly, it always comes back to being creative/me. In these sorts of situations, I feel especially fortunate to be a creator at my core. So I didn’t pause my creativity (book writing, contributor writing, reading, etc.), in an effort to make as much time as possible for interview prep. I think marketers (especially those for the kind of brands/companies that strive to maintain a level of cultural relevancy aka “cool factor”) are better at their jobs when they get all warm and cuddly in their creative feelings. So, despite how excited I was about my upcoming interviews, I didn’t want that aspect of myself to go stale even for a second. And, I must say, I am glad I didn’t, because I got some pretty whimsical questions throughout this process…(“If you were a color in a crayon box, what color would you be?”)

 

(Coral, of course )

 

Xo Charlene

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